Tag Archives: tips

The risks of using pagers in healthcare

5 attack scenarios and 3 tips how to avoid them

Article written by specialists at the Trend Micro Foward-Looking Threat Research Lab

Over sixty years ago, healthcare professionals were among the first to adopt a new communication tool: the pager. This little instrument combined technology from walkie-talkies and automobile radios, resulting in a handy little tool that allowed the transmission of messages (or ‘pages’) to other pagers up to 25 miles away. And although smartphones have taken over communication in the outside world, the healthcare industry has never really said goodbye to pagers. They offer a few crucial advantages to healthcare professionals: they don’t suffer from the often weak cellular coverage in hospitals nor do they interfere with medical equipment. Continue reading

What not to do in 2016: A list of “don’ts” for CIOs

CIOs 2016Last year was a big year for cyber security – and not necessarily in a good way. A few high-profile data breaches made the news, according to Network World, including several that involved health insurance companies (e.g., Anthem and Premera) and one huge breach on an important federal government office (the Office of Personnel Management). The latter especially was cause for concern, as the confidential information of almost 22 million current and former federal employees was stolen, along with the biometric data of 5 million people. Continue reading

As 600 million users are exposed to password hack, are your employee devices safe?

By Albert Kramer

Data-wissen-Trend-MicroBring Your Own Device (BYOD) has for the past few years been both a cause of sleepless nights for security bosses and a major flash point between the business and IT. To that we can now add wearable technology – smart watches, fitness trackers, head-mounted displays and the like which threaten to leak corporate data and expand the enterprise risk surface even further. IT consumerisation took another hit this month when research revealed that some of the most popular apps in the world have password brute force vulnerabilities, exposing as many as 600 million Android and iOS users. Continue reading