Tag Archives: cybercrime

Charting the changes in cybercrime over the past five years

The cybercrime economy is one of the runaway success stories of the 21st century — at least, for those who participate in it. Estimates claim it could be worth over $1trillion annually, more than the GDP of many countries. Part of that success is due to its ability to evolve and shift as the threat landscape changes. Trend Micro has been profiling the underground cybercrime community for several years. And over the past five, we’ve seen a major shift to new platforms, communications channels, products and services, as trust on the dark web erodes and new market demands emerge.

Continue reading

Don’t think of keeping them out, they’re probably already in

According to American media unidentified hackers recently breached at least one US critical infrastructure. “Since May, hackers have been penetrating the computer networks of companies that operate nuclear power stations and other energy facilities.” (The New York Times, July 6th)

“Today we see more attacks on ICS, industrial control systems, and scada systems”, says Robert McArdle, EMEA Threat Research Lead at Trend Micro.

Continue reading

Like WannaCry, Petya ransomware uses the EternalBlue exploit

 A large-scale ransomware attack reported to be caused by a variant of the Petya ransomware is currently hitting various users, particularly in Europe. This variant, which Trend Micro already detects as RANSOM_PETYA.SMA, is known to use both the EternalBlue exploit and the PsExec tool as infection vectors.

Continue reading

Fake news for sale

A ground-breaking new study from Trend Micro has revealed for the first time the size and maturity of the online fake news business, where a 12-month campaign to influence the result of an election could cost as little as €357.700.

The comprehensive 77-page report breaks down the key steps used to influence public opinion: from reconnaissance of the target audience and weaponisation – preparation of the fake story – to delivery and exploitation via social media, and sustainment with additional propaganda.  Continue reading